2011-10-05

What are you looking for?

David Huggins

If a key position on your organizational team is vacant right now you are really lucky!

 

You have a great opportunity to fill it with someone who can make an incredible difference for good. On the other hand, you could also recruit someone who’s mediocre, less than optimal, and generally indifferent to your vision and strategic thrust. The choice is yours! Most employers recognize that mindset and attitude are even more important than knowledge, skills and experience. Any person with ‘will-power’ is preferable to those who simply offer ‘way-power’. Will-power will stimulate learning and effort; way-power guarantees very little in the way of results.

 

Now here’s a challenge – what specific attributes will accurately and reliably demonstrate will-power? Everyone I know has a preferred opinion yet no one has an impeccable track record in hiring. Over recent years though, behavioral scientists have measured the impact of specific attributes and have revealed that not all mindsets are created equal. After careful consideration of the research and cross-comparison with many years of assessment experience, I’ve discovered three main areas for attention. They are Relationships - 3Cs; Focus - 2Cs; and Development - 1C. Perhaps I could share these with you with an invitation for open dialogue on your experiences?

 

The three Cs center on RelationshipsCommunity, Connectedness and Collaboration. If a person cannot work effectively with others what chance is there for the creation of added value, innovation, customer satisfaction, satisfaction, retention, harmony and synergies of effort? No matter how brilliant an individual might be, true value is created at the interface between people and ideas; rarely is it manifested inside a single person’s head. Even when this does happen it is always refined and improved by sharing.

 

The two Cs which depict Focus are Commitment and Contribution. Few would argue about these and yet employers are shy about specifying precisely what it is they need in either area. Contribution needs to be clearly defined as a core expectation which is explicitly stated and reinforced. Full transference of responsibility for results (the What and the Why) also has to occur before meaningful contribution is possible. We’ll all work more diligently and resiliently when we own the responsibility for outcomes – it’s a matter of tapping into our personal pride of performance.

 

The remaining C is DevelopmentCultivation or continuous growth. Why would anyone invest in a wasting asset? You’ll maintain and improve all other assets where and whenever possible; are your human assets worth less? Here again though, you need evidence of past effort and success or you’re investing blindly.

 

Are you clear on what you’re looking for?

 


David Huggins MASc, FIoD, CMS is an experienced behavioral scientist and executive coach who’s dedicated to bringing out the best in individuals and groups. His insights and direct contributions have taken business leaders to elevated dimensions in performance. He can be reached through his websites at www.andros.org and www.polarisprogram.com

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